Stats on interracial dating and relationships

Differences in racial composition of metropolitan and non-metropolitan populations may also account for some of the gap: 83 percent of newlyweds in non-metro areas are white, compared to 62 percent in metro areas.

Hispanics and Asians, on the other hand, make up 26 percent of newlyweds in metro areas and only 10 percent in non-metro areas—and they’re much more likely than white people to marry outside their ethnic groups.

“Part of it is about numbers,” says Pew senior researcher Gretchen Livingston, a co-author of the report.

“The pool of potential spouses in urban areas in the U. tends to be a bit more diverse in terms of race and ethnicity than the pool in rural areas, so that fact in and of itself can increase the likelihood of intermarriage.” Livingston cites the example of Honolulu, where 42 percent of newlyweds are intermarried and the population is 42 percent Asian, 20 percent white, and 9 percent Hispanic.

The interactive map accompanying the report shows the huge variation in intermarriage rates across the U. Public perception of intermarriage might play a part: 45 percent of adults in urban areas say that “more people of different races marrying each other is a good thing for society,” the study reports.

That’s a finding from a new report from the Pew Research Center looking at the state of interracial marriage today.

Supreme Court struck down laws against interracial marriage, interracial couples are more common than ever before—especially in cities.

Rates have steadily increased since 1967, when the Supreme Court’s ruling barred states from outlawing interracial marriage.

Although 11 percent of white newlyweds are now married to someone of a different race or ethnicity, white people are still the least likely of all major racial or ethnic groups to intermarry.

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